Spectrum Sells Out Condos at Last, Spate of New Restaurants Opening

January 16, 2013 7:31 PM5 comments

The Spectrum, whose initial efforts at selling residential condominium units ran into the teeth of the great recession five years ago, is now on the verge of being sold out as the last unsold unit is due for settlement next week, according to the Falls Church Economic Development Office in its monthly summary of new developments issued this Tuesday.

Meanwhile, 12,000 square feet of office condo space remains unsold in the building, while the opening of Moby Dick’s and Sweet Frog Frozen Yogurt this month, and the expected opening of Beadazzled (beads and jewelry) in the next two weeks is finally filling out the retail component of the project.

It’s boom time for new restaurants in the City of Falls Church, too. In addition to Moby Dick’s and Sweet Frog, the new Li’l Italian Restaurant is open at 926 W. Broad, a Dunkin’ Donuts outlet is open at 101 E. Annandale where the new Caribbean Plate restaurant will open a few doors down later this week. Curry Mantra 2 is slated for a mid-February opening at 1077 W. Broad and Burger 7 will open in the Giant Shopping Center in March.

Meanwhile, the popular Luzmilla’s Bolivian Restaurant at 809 W. Broad is expanded into an adjacent space. Despite building renovation plans, Meat in the Box will remain at its 312 S. Washington location.

Incoming new grocery stores include the Troika-Gastronom, opening at the Tower Square Shopping Center in April, and the Good Fortune Supermarket slated to open this fall in the Eden Center has downsized its plans to 44,000 square feet to permit more parking.

New health and fitness-related businesses include the Better Body Studio, Cross Fit Falls Church, Five Rings Fitness, Ortho Care and Urgent Care.

Then there are the new Brits on Broad, Diana Lewkowicz Photography, Bay Business Group, Edward Jones Financial (Kevin McFarland), Tower Square Barber Shop, Dominion Jewelers (hoping to be in and operating in their new building at 917 W. Broad by the end of January) and Sleepy’s Mattresses.

The 500 and 510 W. Annandale office buildings were sold to PMA Properties, LLC, a medical group, in December for $4.675 million. Rehab plans have been developed for both buildings, and the medical group will occupy one of them, leasing the rest. The Pearson Square apartments are 95 percent occupied now, and the last available retail space in The Byron, 513 W. Broad, will be taken.

Moreover, construction is now well underway on two major projects – the Northgate at 472 N. Washington, expected to be completed by late summer or fall, and the Hilton Garden Inn at 706 W. Broad St., expected to open in the first quarter of 2014.

The City is in focused negotiations for large-scale projects in the 200-300 block of W. Broad (anchored by a Harris Teeter), and one on S. Maple at the current location of International Motors. Both of those projects could commence during 2013.

A wine and cheese reception to mark the opening of the Lewkowicz studio at 710 W. Broad is slated for this Saturday, Jan. 19 from 7 to 10 p.m.

  • http://twitter.com/bflo_gal ChrisRaymond

    And of course all this business activity will not mean even more traffic on already overloaded Broad Street, despite what your eyes might tell you. All those businesses only take money from people who walk there.

    • c0mment

      The only people spending money at Mad Fox have walked there?

      • http://www.facebook.com/people/Mike-Smith/100002309640996 Mike Smith

        Walking there isn’t hard, it’s walking away that can be tough.

    • SS

      This… what?

  • http://twitter.com/poseidonguy1 PoseidonGuy

    This article is terrible news for the anti-development crowd. Ya know, the people who paid nothing for their houses several decades ago and now have no problems paying Falls Church’s absurd property taxes. They must be crying at the thought of supply and demand in action.

    It’s unfortunate that the knee-jerk reaction to a legitimate issue–traffic–is to call for no more new businesses. Believe it or not, we can actually use the revenue from the new businesses to improve infrastructure and traffic flow. We might actually be like a real city one day!

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