Arts & Entertainment

Restaurant Spotlight: Fortune Chinese Seafood Restaurant

The crème de la crème of seafood and the most authentic of Asian cuisines have come together at Fortune Chinese Seafood Restaurant. Boastfully standing out amidst the other small, typical shops, Fortune’s only apparent mission is to serve you the best seafood at prices fit for every budget and appetite. RS-fortune

The crème de la crème of seafood and the most authentic of Asian cuisines have come together at Fortune Chinese Seafood Restaurant. Boastfully standing out amidst the other small, typical shops, Fortune’s only apparent mission is to serve you the best seafood at prices fit for every budget and appetite.

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Fortune Chinese Seafood Restaurant (Photo: News-Press)

At Fortune, it’s not the hostess who greets you first, but the fresh lobsters in their spacious tank, oblivious of their future. The scarlet crustaceans are seasonal, as are the jumbo oysters and Dungeness crabs also offered. It’s only logical to hurry on over before the critters are no more. If these delectables are not available, however, there are literally hundreds of additional choices on the menu to fill the void.

To start, sit back and wait as a waitress brings you a cartful of steamy Dim Sums. Instead of pouring over the two-page menu dedicated to the famous dumplings, let your eyes and noses do the deciding. Packed in tin bowls of two, three or four, the Dim Sums are a sufficient reason in itself to visit the restaurant. Though largely prepared with much of the same ingredients, such as shrimp, pork or chicken, no two Dim Sum taste the same. The Steamed Shrimp Dumpling ($3), encased in a thin flour wrap, provides a savory goodness as opposed to the Steamed Shrimp & Shark’s Fin Dumpling ($2.75), which is more meaty. For more diversity, have a go at the Bean Rice Noodle Crepe ($2.75), Marinated Octopus ($5.75) or perhaps even the Jellyfish ($5.75). Though these exotic flavors may require an acquired taste, any of the Dim Sum is well worth a try.

With enough tables to seat at least 200 people, gold chandeliers and gigantic, poster-size paintings, Fortune Chinese Restaurant is constantly rushing in patrons, and for good reason too – the variety of the foods is large enough to entertain customers with many different tastes every day of the year. Beginning with the appetizers, the menu is already noticeably different. The majority of this section is not dominated by Spring Rolls ($1.50), but instead by Marinated Cuttlefish ($7.50), Stuffed Crab Claws ($6.50) and even Sesame Boneless Duck’s Feet ($9.50). Furthermore, an entire portion of the menu is dedicated to the soups, which range from the typical Wonton Soup ($2) to more uncommon Crabmeat with Asparagus Soup ($10.95 for two).

Living up to its name, the Seafood Restaurant also serves up other tastes of the ocean with Baby Clams ($12.50) with either black bean sauce or ground pork. Also on the menu is Frog ($16.95), which tests your Fear Factor eligibility, but there’s more to the dish than just fried frog legs, as adorned by ginger scallions or yellow chives that the restaurant offers.

Upon inquiry, the staff is also happy to recommend their favorites, among which are the Beef Brisket with Turnip in Casserole ($12.95), a sort of stew with tender pieces of beef and radish, and the Buddhist’s Delight ($14.95), a choice that is an absolute must. And yet, none of the Chef’s Recommendations have been covered. This vast part of the menu, decorated with Salt Baked Soft-shell Crabs with Chilies and Butter ($15.95), Whole Flounder Filet (seasonal) and more, rightfully demands much of your attention.

If it is the typical Chinese takeout with fried rice, lo mein and orange chicken you crave, set aside the Fortune Chinese Seafood Restaurant for another time. This hard-to-miss restaurant calls for the more adventurous rather than the Americanized-Asian food junkies, though it will not discriminate against the less exciting Eastern cuisine mongers.

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