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25 Union Soldiers from Civil War Buried In Falls Church to be Dedicated May 30

In observance of the Civil War Sesquicentennial, a memorial to 25 Union soldiers will be dedicated on Memorial Day, May 30, in the yard of The Historic Falls Church. The event will occur in conjunction with the annual Memorial Day parade and festivities in F.C. that day. The soldiers were interred there during the years 1861-1864. Major General Lawrence P. Flynn, former Adjutant General of New York and Commander of the New York Army National Guard, will be the keynote speaker at the dedication ceremony. The service will be held at 12:30 p.m. at The Falls Church, 115 East Fairfax Street, located in downtown Falls Church.

A volunteer research team, working with The Falls Church, has identified the Union soldiers who were buried at the church. The majority were soldiers from the 20th New York State Militia/80th New York Volunteer Infantry and the144th New York Volunteer Infantry. Others were from the 14th, 21st, 23rd New York Volunteer Infantry and 16th New York Cavalry regiments. All soldiers were stationed at Upton’s Hill and other nearby camp sites. Identification was confirmed through notations made in regimental documents at the National Archives in Washington, D.C. Some of the soldiers who were initially buried at the Church have been removed to other locations. Civil War collector, author, and historian Seward R. Osborne initiated the effort to identify the Union soldiers buried at the Church. He is a 100 per cent disabled veteran who now lives in New York State. He devoted over three decades to research of the 20th New York State Militia known as the Ulster Guard. In 2002 Bradley Gernand, while writing his book, A Virginia Village Goes to War, identified 18 Union soldiers who were buried at the Church during the Civil War. Ron Anzalone, Vice Chairman of the Falls Church Historical Commission, provided additional leads to identify soldiers. Most recently, Richard Griffin headed the team that researched original documents at the National Archives.

 

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