Arts & Entertainment

Committed Cast Stands Out in McLean High’s ‘A View from the Bridge’

Family relationships are some of the most rewarding, but difficult parts of life.  The more difficult aspects are expressed in, A View from the Bridge, which was produced masterfully by McLeanHigh School.

 
Arthur Miller’s, A View from the Bridge, premiered in 1955 to critical accolades, and has been revived many times since then.  The story follows Eddie, an Italian-American, his wife Beatrice, and their adopted niece Catherine.  When their cousins illegally emigrate from Italy to America, Eddie loses Catherine’s attention as she finds herself falling in love with one of them.  As Eddie’s jealousy grows, the entire family has to deal with the way his actions affect them, and acknowledge Eddie’s true feelings towards his niece.
 
The dynamic energy within this cast truly made every emotional connection clear.  Every actor was clearly committed, and helped to make this show a strong one.  All fight choreography was performed with impressive precision, and, although it made some lines difficult to understand, none of the actors ever dropped their accents. All of these aspects together helped to create a touching and meaningful performance.
 
As Eddie, Damian Leverett was a true standout in the cast.  His every intention was clear, his emotions were palpable, and he added intensity to every scene.  Matching his commitment was Lexie Shoaibi as Catherine.  The emotional journey of her character was captivating, and presented with incredible passion.  The complex relationship between these two characters made their every interaction riveting.
 
As the immigrant cousin Rodolpho, Max Johnson was utterly charming.  He also portrayed his character’s emotional state with subtlety, adding depth to his scenes without losing a sense of humor.  As his violent brother Marco, John Williams also brought energy to his every scene.
 
Several unique technical aspects were utilized in this show, from smoking gutters lighting to aromas.  The small Black Box theatre space was transformed into a intimate house, complete with a sidewalk outside.  Although not impeccably detailed, the entire set was very impressive.  All props were period, adding a true period feeling to the show.  All of the parts of this show melded together seamlessly to produce a show with both heart and hate.
 
A View from the Bridge is the story of family, and the way relationships can easily become distorted.  McLean’s production was able to highlight the most impressive aspects of the story, leaving behind a show to which everyone can relate.
 
Amanda Miesner is a student at Chantilly High School and a member of Cappies, the Critics and Awards Program for High School Theatre and Journalism.


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