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Northside Social Adds New Parking in Nearby Condo Lot

THE FIRST NINE parking spots Northside Social acquired from the Park Towers Condominiums, with chalk signs identifying the spaces. (Photo: News-Press)

Northside Social in Falls Church announced it has acquired 10 new parking spots — the first for the popular restaurant — from Park Towers Condominiums. The move to add spaces, announced on social media Monday, comes after an unprecedented number of cars have been towed in the neighborhood since the coffee and wine bar opened with just a lone accessible parking space six months ago.

The new spots include nine spaces running along the Park Ave. side of the Park Towers parking lot and the tenth is a corner spot facing the 200 Park Ave. office building that houses Sylvan Learning Center.

In a post on Facebook and Instagram, Northside Social said, “We have temporary signage up at the moment and will have permanent signage up in the coming weeks. It’s a holiday season miracle!”

A CLOSE UP of one of the temporary signs Northside put up to identify its parking spots, this one being the lone parking spot facing the 200 Park Ave. office building. (Photo: News-Press)

The lack of dedicated parking for Northside Social was a contentious issue on many fronts for the establishment upon its opening in mid-June this year.

Customers parked in nearby private lots and contributed to a 13,000-percent increase in towing from the previous year in the surrounding area. Neighboring business owners were unhappy Northside Social was permitted to open without having to supply and finance its own parking arrangements — a prerequisite other businesses had to satisfy in order to operate in the City.

After the City’s decision to open public street parking spaces directly adjacent to Northside Social along both Park and Maple Ave., the ensuing congestion on both streets brought safety concerns to the forefront.

The lot at the corner of Park and Maple Ave. was the home to the City’s oldest freestanding structure, the Cloverdale house, which had been derelict for years before Liberty Tavern Group purchased the property and transformed it into the now-bustling restaurant.